Wednesday | 6.00pm > 7.30pm

From Wednesday, October 7th To Wednesday, December 16th
Join Algerian native Nacer Chambi for a discussion of Albert Camus’s first, and most celebrated novel. Published under the cloud of World War II and fascist-controlled Vichy France, The Stranger, is a story of isolation and alienation, in which the novel’s protagonist, Meursault, an Algerian of French descent, wanders through a series of experiences that make an example of the absurdity of the human condition, an illustration of Camus’s “philosophy of the absurd.” Neither French, nor truly Algerian, isolated from all mankind, Meursault follows a path of simultaneous self-destruction and self-enlightenment. Camus’s work gained the attention of philosopher and leader of the Existentialist movement Jean-Paul Sartre, bringing its author to a stardom culiminating in his award of the Nobel prize for literature at the tender age of 44. Nacer provides context through his personal perspective and analysis of themes that will include:

– Camus’s impoverished childhood in Algeria
– His first attempts at writing and entry onto the literary scene
– His meeting and disputes with the Existantialist movement, and with Jean-Paul Sartre in particular
– His philosophy of the absurd as seen through the life of Meursault
– A comparison with American author William Faulkner, Nobel prize laureate in 1949
– Discussions of the world we live in and why Camus still matters today

Students must buy their own book: Mass Market Paperback : 185 pages Publisher : Gallimard; Revised ed. Edition (December 1, 1971) SBN-13 : 978-2070360024 Available on Amazon.com.

Monday | 10.00am > 11.30am

From Monday, October 5th To Monday, December 14th
Join Algerian native Nacer Chambi for a discussion of Albert Camus’s first, and most celebrated novel. Published under the cloud of World War II and fascist-controlled Vichy France, The Stranger, is a story of isolation and alienation, in which the novel’s protagonist, Meursault, an Algerian of French descent, wanders through a series of experiences that make an example of the absurdity of the human condition, an illustration of Camus’s “philosophy of the absurd.” Neither French, nor truly Algerian, isolated from all mankind, Meursault follows a path of simultaneous self-destruction and self-enlightenment. Camus’s work gained the attention of philosopher and leader of the Existentialist movement Jean-Paul Sartre, bringing its author to a stardom culiminating in his award of the Nobel prize for literature at the tender age of 44. Nacer provides context through his personal perspective and analysis of themes that will include:

– Camus’s impoverished childhood in Algeria
– His first attempts at writing and entry onto the literary scene
– His meeting and disputes with the Existantialist movement, and with Jean-Paul Sartre in particular
– His philosophy of the absurd as seen through the life of Meursault
– A comparison with American author William Faulkner, Nobel prize laureate in 1949
– Discussions of the world we live in and why Camus still matters today

Students must buy their own book: Mass Market Paperback : 185 pages Publisher : Gallimard; Revised ed. Edition (December 1, 1971) SBN-13 : 978-2070360024 Available on Amazon.com.

 

Reduced/early bird price ends September 19th.

Meet the teacher

Meet the teacher

Nacer Chambia native of Algeria, worked for more than 30 years in Algeria as Inspector of Finance, then as Judge in the Government Accountability Office (Cour des Comptes), and finally Director of Control and Training, while teaching the management control at Algiers University. In 1973, he graduated in economics and finance from the National School of Administration of Algeria (ENA). In 1977, he obtained an MBA in management control and economic development at the University of Paris IX Dauphine. Former member of International Organizations of Supreme Audit (INTOSAI), he participated in several seminars around the world. In the United States with his family since 1995, he has worked as a French teacher at the Language Studies Institute, the International School of Palo Alto of the Peninsula (ISTP), and for Palo Alto French Education (PAFEA). Before moving to Alpharetta in June 2019, he was a professor and Menlo Park Center Manager of the Alliance Française of Silicon Valley. His favorite citation is from Albert Camus: « Ma patrie, c’est la langue française. »